Building the Lean Bench at NH Lottery Commission

At  the New Hampshire Lottery Commission, not only are we building the Lean bench by adding 2 Green Belts and 12 Yellow Belts, we are also piloting our own grassroots mentoring program for supervisors.  The NH Bureau of Education and Training is a great partner in training and it’s up to us as an agency to follow up with discussions about what we’ve learned and how to put what we’ve learned into practice.

 Facilitator and mentor of the group, Edie Chiasson, who also serves as the NH Lottery Commission’s Lean Coordinator notes, “In addition to my role as a mentor for Lean initiatives and lifelong learning, I have a responsibility to help prepare the next generation for the challenges they will encounter. It is a critical component of succession planning for any organization.”

 Program participant, Travis Emerson states, “The S.T.A.R. program has allowed us an opportunity to collaborate, sharing ideas and best practices across departmental boundaries. We are learning from each other which improves our performance as leaders and supervisors.”

 The mentoring program is titled S.T.A.R. (Supervisors That Are Resources).  Our pilot group (see photo) meets weekly, with a strict time limit of 30 minutes, to explore various topics.  If more than 30 minutes is needed to discuss a topic, it is continued at the next meeting. Topics can come from a BET training session (from Lean, CPM, CPS, Foundations of Supervision, etc.), from a book (any Lean, Management, or Leadership book), or current challenge (morale, motivation, inspiration, etc.).  To date the group has explored:  Team dynamics – The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Employee appreciation and inclusion – How to be a Dream Manager, Emotional Intelligence – The Five Components of Emotional Intelligence at Work, Leaders paying it forward – Step Up and Lead; Puzzles – How to approach putting pieces together; Managing Up – Managing is not just one way; and Leaders are responsible for outcomes – Extreme Ownership.  

 The program is an immediate success with participants learning from each other. Inevitably, everyone leaves the meetings feeling inspired and eager to get back to work with their teams. It sets a positive tone for the day!

 

Pictured left to right: Travis Emerson – Lean Green Belt; Edie Chiasson – Lean Black Belt/mentor, Tonya Walsh – Lean Yellow Belt, Carmela Nolin – Lean Yellow Belt, Tiffani McIntosh – Lean Green Belt

Congratulations to the NH Lottery Commission on their Lean advancement!

Leadership and Continued Learning

A 3-5 minute read on the importance of  investment with continuous improvement both as an individual and a team. Mentoring and continual learning go hand-in-hand.

Government agencies offer consistency, a dependable hierarchy, a foundation that the country depends on in good times and bad. But it can also be a place where it’s difficult to change or inspire creative thinking. Better leadership that focuses on an increase in return on investment (ROI) can help. Leaders who value and encourage their teams to do this focus on continuous improvement.

Blog posting by Timothy Etson

Source: https://www.govloop.com/community/blog/leadership-great-leaders-encourage-excellence-continuous-improvement/

Lean work and projects are the perfect opportunity for continued growth and learning.

Lean Approach Considerations

https://blog.kainexus.com/

Interesting and recent blog posts for Lean Healthcare Code

and

How to Have Better Team Huddles.

A great tool for Lean program management development considerations.

How are you using huddles as a tool for with process improvement?

Project DICE Scores-What Are They?

Greetings Fellow Process Improvement Engineers!

Today we spend some time on a model used in change management practices.  Lean facilitators have a keen perspective for change management and often times know the “secret recipe” for successful project implementation. Change management is a complex component of process improvement. How do you know if a team is ready for change? How do you know this from a data perspective?

Have you heard of the term DICE used for project management readiness scoring? It may be a useful and applicable tool for process improvement projects.

DICE stands for:

Duration is the length of a project. How long is the project or what is the span in between projects?

Integrity refers to delivering on time. Does a team possess the necessary skills to complete the project on time?

Commitment explains how committed are executive leadership to lead and support a change. Employees are also scored on this scale. Because there are two different scores, this adds objectivity to the calculation.

Effort is defined as the actual work required above and beyond the employee’s current tasks. What is the level of effort required to complete a project?

 

Each of the four components are broken down into a scoring system of 1-4 and computed into the following mathematical formula

= D +(2 x I) + (2  x C1) + C2 + E

The scoring of DICE categories is staged in 3 zones:

Win Zone: Scoring of 7-14 have a high confidence of being successful.

Worry Zone: Scoring of 14-17 have risk associated with the project and require attention right away.

Woe Zone: Scoring of 17 and over have a high level of risk, need decisions to be made ASAP in order to save the project.

 

With any Lean process improvement project, we must explore and expand our personal tool boxes. The DICE method may offer an objective way to evaluate a project team’s change investment and level of readiness.

We’d love to hear if you have used this method and how it worked.

References: https://explore.easyprojects.net/blog/project-management-101-dice-framework

https://hbr.org/2015/07/a-way-to-assess-and-prioritize-your-change-efforts

Promoting Lean

https://prd.blogs.nh.gov/das/NHLEAN/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/IMG_0293-300x225.jpg

On Thursday June 7, 2018 Colonel Christopher Wagner, Lt. Jeff Ladieu and Sgt. Thomas Lencki spoke about Lean and the State Police on the NH Today with Jack Heath Radio Show. Every Thursday the State Police conducts a segment on the NH Today with Jack Heath, that highlights the men and women of the State Police. Jack Heath had never heard about Lean and how successful it has been for the State Police and Department of Safety. The segment was very informative and as the group was leaving the studio, a listener commented that she had adopted a Lean way of thinking many years ago and she was excited that the State Police had also adopted a Lean way of thinking.

To hear the podcast follow the link and create an account:

https://www.iheart.com/podcast/139-New-Hampshire-Today-with-J-27984874/episode/6-7-nh-today-nhsp-29431306/

 

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