Fall 2019 Local Lean Summit-Registration is Open

Challenging times call for creativity, resourcefulness, and a fresh approach.

On Friday, November 1, the University of New Hampshire in partnership with the State of New Hampshire will host the 2019 Lean Summit ‘So You Think You Know Lean’ at the Memorial Union Building on the UNH Campus in Durham, NH.

This collaboration partners Lean practitioners from higher education, state agencies, nonprofits, and regional businesses to provide energizing conversations, creative solutions, and expansive ideas. Registration is open and closes on Sunday, October 27.

Lean is an approach to running any organization or process with a focus on continuous improvements and innovative ideas that create great results. The 2019 Lean Summit is committed to the spirit of innovation, and to help practitioners deliver value and efficiency through Lean and Continuous Process Improvement. Participants will hear from an array of Lean experts, network with other Lean practitioners, and participate in hands-on activities to introduce new ideas to help sharpen toolsets. Last year, the Lean Summit drew over 260 attendees.

This year’s Summit features a special keynote speaker, numerous learning opportunities, engaging, interactive sessions, and a chance to integrate and learn from other Lean practitioners. Registration for the 2019 Lean Summit is FREE to University System Employees (UNH, KSC, PSU, GSC, and USNH) and State of NH employees by using a coupon code.  For the State of New Hampshire or affiliated non-profits coupon code please contact Heather.Barto@dhhs.nh.gov.

Affiliated non profits is defined as a person/team/organization who has completed or is registered for training through the NH Bureau of Education and Training.

To register, go to http://unh.edu/lean/lean-summit.

 

2019 NH Lean Summit

SAVE THE DATE

 2019 NH Lean Summit “So You Think You Know Lean”

November 1, 2019

University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Ready for the NH Lean Summit?

Focus Areas of the Lean Summit:

  • Walking the Walk
  • Lean and You
  • Holistic Change
  • Exploring Your Toolbox

The Lean Summit is organized and planned by UNH in collaboration with the State of New Hampshire Lean Executive Committee

For higher education questions or public industry questions contact Dagmar Vlahos, UNH Senior Process Engineer, Dagmar.Vlahos@unh.edu

For State or affiliated non-profit questions contact Heather Barto, DHHS Process Improvement Specialist, Heather.Barto@dhhs.nh.gov

Lean Black Belt Highlight

2019 Lean Black Belt Project Highlight: Lean for Leadership Collaborative

Part 3 of a 3 Part Series

In our previous Lean blog posts, we heard from Suzy and Colin about the value of Lean for Leaders Collaborative and the roll out of their program. This three part series documents  the story of their Lean Black Belt journey.

Question 1: What would you tell anyone who is interested in learning about Lean Black Belt?

Colin:There’s always more than one way to accomplish a task. Lean Black Belt, Lean in any manner really, represents the concept that learning is on-going and respecting varied perspectives is an immense “value-add” to any organization.”

Suzy:The value of the Lean Black Belt program reaches far beyond the confines of the classroom–it is the networking, the sharing of ideas and camaraderie that grow a Lean culture into a sustainable entity. The tools themselves hold great value but what the Lean Black Belt program taught me is that the true value add is in the relationships you build, the trust you establish and ongoing communication required to maintain and sustain a Lean culture.”

 

Question 2: We have heard about your Lean for Leaders Collaborative. What might a bureau or program expect to benefit from having a trained Lean Black Belt in their group?

Colin:You don’t necessarily need a trained Lean Black Belt in your group; you just need to know that resources are out there, what they are, how to engage with the resources, and why it matters.”

Suzy:A well-seasoned Lean Black Belt in any organization would be a benefit to a Lean culture. I feel a Lean Black Belt can offer is the experience to step back and provide insight and recommendations into effective methods for continuous process improvement that go beyond a Kaizen event. A Lean Black Belt is prepared to encourage principles and concepts that may be a little bit more out of the box than traditional Lean tools.”

 

Question 3: Colin, what are your observations about the Lean methods working in state government?

Colin:Collaboration within Department of Administrative Services, as it pertains to Lean, is something I am seeing and hearing about very frequently. In my division, Procurement and Support Services, we are very focused on the benefits that stem from Lean tools and Lean thinking. My director makes it a priority to put work groups together for as many opportunities as possible that relate to continuous improvement. We are establishing internal training seminars, we are focused on mentorships, and we are celebrating all of the ways our “individual contributors” add value to various projects and project teams. A large part of our division mission is a focus on best-in-class customer service and we see continuous improvement as a way to keep ourselves fresh and proactive for the benefit of our internal and external customers (ourselves included).”

 

Question 4: Suzy, any plans for moving Lean forward?

Suzy:NH Hospital is in a full court press to bring Lean into our Hospital. We are engaged in a two-tiered approach both at the top and at the foundation of our hospital. For Leadership we are rolling out “Lean for Leaders” as an introduction to the basics of fostering a Lean Culture. After the initial presentations have been conducted my plan is to offer follow up micro-sessions to dive deeper into these Lean Leadership concepts:

  • Shingo Guiding Principles– Lead With Humility. Humility may be seen as a sign of weakness. Respect Every Individual. Focus on Process. Embrace Scientific Thinking. Flow and Pull Value. Assure Quality at the Source. Seek Perfection. Create Constancy of Purpose. Etc.
  • Hoshin KanriOrganic flow of communication with the intention of the technique to let the strategic goals of the organization guide every decision and action.
  • Yokoten– Refers to the practice of copying good results of kaizen in one area to other areas. Horizontal deployment of information. PDCA.

 

Chuck Bagley, Heather Barto and I are providing a custom Lean Yellow Belt training for leadership and staff at NH Hospital using a Plan Do Check Act model. Even more exciting is that we will be utilizing the talents of several NH Hospital Lean Green Belt staff to keep the Lean progress flowing! Training will be conducted with group 1 in a weekly format over a few months to ensure time to discuss and incorporate the practical application of Lean tools in the workplace. We have over 35 people interested already! As a means to support and sustain the learning process we will also hold a DHHS Lean Learning Labs open to any and all that want to discuss Lean concepts, mentorship, culture, and more.

I am already hearing about people’s 5S stories just a few days after presenting the Lean for Leaders Collaboration! The forward progress at NH Hospital is gaining momentum! It is exciting to experience the training from Black Belt evolve into performance in the workplace and beyond.”

Congratulations to Colin and Suzy for their hard work in Lean at the State of New Hampshire! We can’t wait to hear more!

The NH Bureau of Education and Training’s program offers Lean training to state employees, community non-profits, and local municipalities for  Lean White Belt, Lean Yellow Belt, Lean Green Belt and Lean Black Belt.

For more information with the State of New Hampshire Lean programming visit http://lean.nh.gov/

Graduate Studies and NH Lean Credits

Edith Chiasson, Lean Black Belt, is a 2019 MPA Graduate Candidate for the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy Master of Public Administration program.  She earned her Lean Black Belt certification through the State of New Hampshire’s Bureau of Education and Training in 2016 and is a member of the State of NH Lean Executive Committee.

Edie shares, “The study of Lean adds value to public service initiatives by acquiring effective process improvement tools complementing the leadership, program evaluation, budgets, planning, personnel, collective bargaining, and policy analysis tools offered as part of the University of New Hampshire’s Master of Public Administration program. Lean management techniques align with public policy implementation, using innovative process improvement to support purpose-filled missions and value-driven cultures. Lean methods and tools are carefully designed to reduce process challenges and improve customer service at every level in our government.”

Edie is currently employed as the Audit Supervisor at the NH Lottery Commission and is using Lean approaches as a system of evaluating effectiveness and efficiency in current policy and procedures to uphold reasonable administrative costs to support and advance the agency’s mission. Edie has also provided leadership and Lean Coordinator support to initiate a pilot mentoring program, onboard newly trained facilitators, and more.

For more on how Edie has integrated Lean into everyday work, contact her directly at Edith.Chiasson@lottery.nh.gov or 603-271-7151.

Congratulations Edie on your upcoming academic achievement and for being a constant champion of continuous process improvement!

Local Lean Publication with Kate McGovern, MPA, Ph.D.

The Public-Sector Journey to Lean written by former New Hampshire Bureau of Education and Trainings (BET) professor, Kate McGovern offers a walk through the many contributions made to process improvement efforts. The book details vignettes and in-depth perspectives on the unique work of government.

Kate McGovern, MPA, Ph.D., Trainer, Professor

The book celebrates the accomplishments and challenges of New Hampshire’s Lean work. Kate’s book walks readers through the tough fight of muda (waste) in times of muri (overburden). The story affirms the creativity and diligence of our Lean practitioners, documenting multiple countermeasures to muri, and the innovations on the New Hampshire approach.

Heather Barto’s innovative Lean Wrap-Around Services Model for the Department of Health and Human Services is discussed, as well as the leadership provided in Department of Safety by Commissioner John Barthelmes, Colonel Chris Wagner, Roberta Witham and Sgt. Tom Lencki, and the camaraderie and commitment of those serving in the Lean Executive Committee (LEC).

While crediting remarkable accomplishments of Lean practitioners, the book urges action by elected and administrative officials. A public policy parable is used to illustrate the challenges in New Hampshire, while Vermont’s program is described as an exemplar.

The story closes with a series of recommendations designed to bring the initiative to the strategic level. The book is dedicated to Sam McKeeman who provided the hands-on Lean training model for the New Hampshire BET. Graduates of Sam’s training formed the core of New Hampshire’s movement for continuous improvement in public service, whereby there today much growth still happening.

Kate will be providing a presentation and signing copies of “Public-Sector Journey to Lean” at BET’s Coffee & Conversation on Wednesday March 20, 2019. A 20% discount code is offered towards the purchase Public-Sector Journey to Lean.

For more information on New Hampshire’s Lean efforts visit http://lean.nh.gov.

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