Process Improvement Work with Case Management

Question: What do Public Health and HIV Case Management Work Have in Common?
Answer: Process.

Process impacts all of each and every day. Both good and bad processes affects our home and work lives. Whether it’s waiting in line at the grocery store, making an online purchase, completing a job application, reviewing a grant, or selecting your favorite lottery ticket at the corner store. Improvements can be made to just about any process, including an application for enrollment process.

The NH Ryan White CARE Program has been leading process improvement efforts under leadership of Lean Black Belt student Melissa Richards, Quality Care Coordinator. Melissa is supported by her supervisor, Sarah McPhee, Lean Green Belt to roll out trainings and engagement with stakeholders. Melissa shares, “The value of Lean and engagement with our stakeholders is exciting and rewarding. When we first rolled out Lean, we worked with our contracted AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) to improve the process of submitting documentation for enrollment in the NH CARE Program. This improvement led to increased satisfaction for both the Case Managers at the ASOs and for the staff at the NH CARE Program. With buy-in from the success of the first project, additional trainings have been conducted. Momentum at this ASO has helped to create further readiness among others and has enabled the NH CARE Program to begin the next iteration of teaching process improvement. By improving the knowledge of Lean and quality improvement at our ASOs, our clients will benefit from smoother processes and improved health outcomes. We are absolutely thrilled.”

The benefits of the improved work flow are being seen at the agency level, within the program, and for clients. The use of the Plan Do Check Act cycles have been pivotal for pulling out lessons learned that later inform adjustments to the process.

Congratulations to Melissa and team members on their investments with process improvement!

About the New BET Lean Professor

Chuck grew up in New Hampshire avidly enjoying the outdoors and working school around that passion whenever possible.  Pursuing this passion academically, he acquired an associates in forest technology from UNH’s Thompson School and a bachelor’s in forest resource management from Central Washington University in Washington State.  He has worked on fire crews, timber crews, and water quality and soil conservation projects in the Pacific Northwest.  His experience with the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Program sharpened his skills in facilitation along with his experience at UNH’s Browne Center, BU’s Sargent Camp, natural resource planning, community facilitation and workplace training.  Chuck’s other great passion is learning about learning.   In pursuing optimal learning, Chuck received a master’s in adult learning and development and a CAGS in the neurodevelopmental approach to teaching.  He’s taught a variety of topics at the undergraduate and graduate level as well as English to refugees and created several faculty development programs.  He is currently completing a doctorate in education focusing on facilitating the development of effective learning practices.  Chuck currently teaches the Yellow Belt, Green Belt and Black Belt certification courses for the NH Bureau of Education and Training.

Welcome to BET Chuck!

Lean Approach Considerations

https://blog.kainexus.com/

Interesting and recent blog posts for Lean Healthcare Code

and

How to Have Better Team Huddles.

A great tool for Lean program management development considerations.

How are you using huddles as a tool for with process improvement?

2018 NH Lean Summit is Coming

2018 NH Lean Summit

University of New Hampshire, Durham Campus

October 26, 2018

Theme: Times are Changing: T-Transforming     I-Inspiring    M-Measuring    E-Engaging

Registration is now open: https://www.unh.edu/lean/lean-summit

The 2018 “Times are Changing” Lean Summit is hosted by the University of New Hampshire and is in partnership with the State of New Hampshire

State of NH employees are eligible for a discounted registration rate. Contact NHLean@nh.gov for additional details.

 

Join us for a day to expand your knowledge and skills with process improvement

Project DICE Scores-What Are They?

Greetings Fellow Process Improvement Engineers!

Today we spend some time on a model used in change management practices.  Lean facilitators have a keen perspective for change management and often times know the “secret recipe” for successful project implementation. Change management is a complex component of process improvement. How do you know if a team is ready for change? How do you know this from a data perspective?

Have you heard of the term DICE used for project management readiness scoring? It may be a useful and applicable tool for process improvement projects.

DICE stands for:

Duration is the length of a project. How long is the project or what is the span in between projects?

Integrity refers to delivering on time. Does a team possess the necessary skills to complete the project on time?

Commitment explains how committed are executive leadership to lead and support a change. Employees are also scored on this scale. Because there are two different scores, this adds objectivity to the calculation.

Effort is defined as the actual work required above and beyond the employee’s current tasks. What is the level of effort required to complete a project?

 

Each of the four components are broken down into a scoring system of 1-4 and computed into the following mathematical formula

= D +(2 x I) + (2  x C1) + C2 + E

The scoring of DICE categories is staged in 3 zones:

Win Zone: Scoring of 7-14 have a high confidence of being successful.

Worry Zone: Scoring of 14-17 have risk associated with the project and require attention right away.

Woe Zone: Scoring of 17 and over have a high level of risk, need decisions to be made ASAP in order to save the project.

 

With any Lean process improvement project, we must explore and expand our personal tool boxes. The DICE method may offer an objective way to evaluate a project team’s change investment and level of readiness.

We’d love to hear if you have used this method and how it worked.

References: https://explore.easyprojects.net/blog/project-management-101-dice-framework

https://hbr.org/2015/07/a-way-to-assess-and-prioritize-your-change-efforts

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