Fall 2019 Local Lean Summit-Registration is Open

Posted by Heather Barto on September 24th, 2019

Challenging times call for creativity, resourcefulness, and a fresh approach.

On Friday, November 1, the University of New Hampshire in partnership with the State of New Hampshire will host the 2019 Lean Summit ‘So You Think You Know Lean’ at the Memorial Union Building on the UNH Campus in Durham, NH.

This collaboration partners Lean practitioners from higher education, state agencies, nonprofits, and regional businesses to provide energizing conversations, creative solutions, and expansive ideas. Registration is open and closes on Sunday, October 27.

Lean is an approach to running any organization or process with a focus on continuous improvements and innovative ideas that create great results. The 2019 Lean Summit is committed to the spirit of innovation, and to help practitioners deliver value and efficiency through Lean and Continuous Process Improvement. Participants will hear from an array of Lean experts, network with other Lean practitioners, and participate in hands-on activities to introduce new ideas to help sharpen toolsets. Last year, the Lean Summit drew over 260 attendees.

This year’s Summit features a special keynote speaker, numerous learning opportunities, engaging, interactive sessions, and a chance to integrate and learn from other Lean practitioners. Registration for the 2019 Lean Summit is FREE to University System Employees (UNH, KSC, PSU, GSC, and USNH) and State of NH employees by using a coupon code.  For the State of New Hampshire or affiliated non-profits coupon code please contact Heather.Barto@dhhs.nh.gov.

Affiliated non profits is defined as a person/team/organization who has completed or is registered for training through the NH Bureau of Education and Training.

To register, go to http://unh.edu/lean/lean-summit.

 

2019 NH Lean Summit

Posted by Heather Barto on August 21st, 2019

SAVE THE DATE

 2019 NH Lean Summit “So You Think You Know Lean”

November 1, 2019

University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Ready for the NH Lean Summit?

Focus Areas of the Lean Summit:

  • Walking the Walk
  • Lean and You
  • Holistic Change
  • Exploring Your Toolbox

The Lean Summit is organized and planned by UNH in collaboration with the State of New Hampshire Lean Executive Committee

For higher education questions or public industry questions contact Dagmar Vlahos, UNH Senior Process Engineer, Dagmar.Vlahos@unh.edu

For State or affiliated non-profit questions contact Heather Barto, DHHS Process Improvement Specialist, Heather.Barto@dhhs.nh.gov

Lean Black Belt Highlight

Posted by Heather Barto on July 8th, 2019

2019 Lean Black Belt Project Highlight: Lean for Leadership Collaborative

Part 3 of a 3 Part Series

In our previous Lean blog posts, we heard from Suzy and Colin about the value of Lean for Leaders Collaborative and the roll out of their program. This three part series documents  the story of their Lean Black Belt journey.

Question 1: What would you tell anyone who is interested in learning about Lean Black Belt?

Colin:There’s always more than one way to accomplish a task. Lean Black Belt, Lean in any manner really, represents the concept that learning is on-going and respecting varied perspectives is an immense “value-add” to any organization.”

Suzy:The value of the Lean Black Belt program reaches far beyond the confines of the classroom–it is the networking, the sharing of ideas and camaraderie that grow a Lean culture into a sustainable entity. The tools themselves hold great value but what the Lean Black Belt program taught me is that the true value add is in the relationships you build, the trust you establish and ongoing communication required to maintain and sustain a Lean culture.”

 

Question 2: We have heard about your Lean for Leaders Collaborative. What might a bureau or program expect to benefit from having a trained Lean Black Belt in their group?

Colin:You don’t necessarily need a trained Lean Black Belt in your group; you just need to know that resources are out there, what they are, how to engage with the resources, and why it matters.”

Suzy:A well-seasoned Lean Black Belt in any organization would be a benefit to a Lean culture. I feel a Lean Black Belt can offer is the experience to step back and provide insight and recommendations into effective methods for continuous process improvement that go beyond a Kaizen event. A Lean Black Belt is prepared to encourage principles and concepts that may be a little bit more out of the box than traditional Lean tools.”

 

Question 3: Colin, what are your observations about the Lean methods working in state government?

Colin:Collaboration within Department of Administrative Services, as it pertains to Lean, is something I am seeing and hearing about very frequently. In my division, Procurement and Support Services, we are very focused on the benefits that stem from Lean tools and Lean thinking. My director makes it a priority to put work groups together for as many opportunities as possible that relate to continuous improvement. We are establishing internal training seminars, we are focused on mentorships, and we are celebrating all of the ways our “individual contributors” add value to various projects and project teams. A large part of our division mission is a focus on best-in-class customer service and we see continuous improvement as a way to keep ourselves fresh and proactive for the benefit of our internal and external customers (ourselves included).”

 

Question 4: Suzy, any plans for moving Lean forward?

Suzy:NH Hospital is in a full court press to bring Lean into our Hospital. We are engaged in a two-tiered approach both at the top and at the foundation of our hospital. For Leadership we are rolling out “Lean for Leaders” as an introduction to the basics of fostering a Lean Culture. After the initial presentations have been conducted my plan is to offer follow up micro-sessions to dive deeper into these Lean Leadership concepts:

  • Shingo Guiding Principles– Lead With Humility. Humility may be seen as a sign of weakness. Respect Every Individual. Focus on Process. Embrace Scientific Thinking. Flow and Pull Value. Assure Quality at the Source. Seek Perfection. Create Constancy of Purpose. Etc.
  • Hoshin KanriOrganic flow of communication with the intention of the technique to let the strategic goals of the organization guide every decision and action.
  • Yokoten– Refers to the practice of copying good results of kaizen in one area to other areas. Horizontal deployment of information. PDCA.

 

Chuck Bagley, Heather Barto and I are providing a custom Lean Yellow Belt training for leadership and staff at NH Hospital using a Plan Do Check Act model. Even more exciting is that we will be utilizing the talents of several NH Hospital Lean Green Belt staff to keep the Lean progress flowing! Training will be conducted with group 1 in a weekly format over a few months to ensure time to discuss and incorporate the practical application of Lean tools in the workplace. We have over 35 people interested already! As a means to support and sustain the learning process we will also hold a DHHS Lean Learning Labs open to any and all that want to discuss Lean concepts, mentorship, culture, and more.

I am already hearing about people’s 5S stories just a few days after presenting the Lean for Leaders Collaboration! The forward progress at NH Hospital is gaining momentum! It is exciting to experience the training from Black Belt evolve into performance in the workplace and beyond.”

Congratulations to Colin and Suzy for their hard work in Lean at the State of New Hampshire! We can’t wait to hear more!

The NH Bureau of Education and Training’s program offers Lean training to state employees, community non-profits, and local municipalities for  Lean White Belt, Lean Yellow Belt, Lean Green Belt and Lean Black Belt.

For more information with the State of New Hampshire Lean programming visit http://lean.nh.gov/

2019 Lean Summit in Maine

Posted by Tom Lencki on June 22nd, 2019

The 2019 Lean Systems Summit agenda is a great local opportunity to meet fellow Lean practitioners.
What a bonus it’s being held in Portland in August; how can you beat that?
We have several speakers from NH joining the agenda to share various aspects of Lean application.

Please follow the link for more information:

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07egd6u4a14d921ba6&llr=lofddvxab

Hope to see you there!

2019 Lean Black Belt Project Highlight: Lean for Leadership Collaborative

Posted by Heather Barto on June 5th, 2019

Part 2 of a 3 Part Series

 This month we used an interview style format to hear what Colin and Suzy are up to with their Lean Black Belt project work.

 

Question: What are the intriguing components that drew you into developing a Lean for Leaders Collaborative?

Colin:There seemed to be a real need to find a way to get the message out about the value that Lean offers. I was also interested in supporting alignments with our Black Belt learning with the Lean Executive Committee’s strategy work and planning.”

Suzy:I think that for me, the intriguing part of the project was how many elements of the Lean for Leaders program seemed to be “un-Lean”. It is a perfect example of how a good program, with good Lean intentions, can fall prey to all manners of waste and inefficiency. It was a challenge to evaluate those components that we felt were key to getting the message across to leadership without getting bogged down in the minutiae.”

 

Question 2: What does the data say from the Lean for Leaders Collaborative?

Colin:Initially, we discovered that there was no way to trace back and report on the impact of past Lean for Leaders seminars. Our main goal with data is to try to measure the number of attendees at a given collaborative, the number of those attendees that want a follow-up discussion relating to lean tools, and ultimately proof that such follow-up resulted in an actual Lean event reported to the Lean Executive Committee.”

Suzy:#1 Data doesn’t lie. Overall, the majority of the feedback was very positive. 19  surveys were returned after two sessions, which tells us straight out of the gait that we need a more efficient system to get a larger number of surveys back! If we are raising awareness and piquing interest in the value of what Lean has to offer, we have accomplished what we set out to do.”

 

Some of the survey data included:

Were you aware of Lean before this session?

100% of the survey participants had a baseline know of Lean.

Does your organization have a robust Lean Culture?

  • 42% responded yes
  • 37% responded no
  • 21% did not respond

Which tools did you find helpful? Will you be applying these tools and concepts in your organization?

  • 8 Types of Work Waste Mode (also known as the acronym DOWNTIME)
  • Impact Effort Matrix
  • Self Assessment Tool
  • Overview of Kaizen event work
  • Gemba Walk

 

Question 3: To close out this interview, what do you see as the most challenging elements in keeping momentum for the Lean for Leaders Collaborative?

Colin: “The most challenging element will be to successfully re-direct Lean inquiries to the lean website and ensure communication channels remain open at the agency, coordinator, and LEC level. Additionally, we need to ensure that the materials are presented appropriately on the site and remain easily accessible.”

Suzy:Now that we have completed our part of the project and successfully (based on feedback) presented the material, there is always the possibility that the Lean for Leaders collaborative will stall. There are still moving parts and elements that need attention but are beyond our control. For example, the uploading of Lean materials on the Lean Website and establishing a consistent method of feedback such as through Survey Monkey. Without being directly involved we will continue to support the endeavor independently and hope that people find the content as valuable as we believe it to be in continuing to move the Lean initiative at the State of New Hampshire forward.”

Part 1 of the 3 Part Series is available at:  https://prd.blogs.nh.gov/das/NHLEAN/?m=201905

Suzy and Colin have one more blog series to share their lens post Lean Black Belt graduation and reflections.

Stay tuned for more information.

For more information contact Colin Capelle at Colin.Capelle@das.nh.gov or to Suzy Easterling-Wood at Susan.Easterling-Wood@dhhs.nh.gov.

Congratulations to Suzy and Colin on their Lean work!

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